Press Release: Yellowstone-Teton Clean Cities Announces Green Fleet Leader Awards

New Funding Announcement: Montana Department of Environmental Quality

The Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) is celebrating National Drive Electric Week with new funding opportunities to help curb nitrogen oxide ​(NOx) emissions with clean transportation. The grants are available for public and private entities and match funds to help make clean transportation affordable.

Apply TodayThe first funding opportunity, the Clean Truck, Bus & Airport Equipment Program, matches funds to replace older diesel trucks, buses or airport ground support vehicles with battery electric, alternate fuel or diesel vehicles. Examples of types of vehicles for this funding opportunity can include garbage trucks​, street sweepers, bucket trucks, buses​, or vehicles that service aircrafts between flights. Applications for this opportunity are due January 14​, 2022.

Clean School BusThe second funding opportunity is the Clean School Bus Program that applies to school districts statewide and matches funds to replace older diesel school buses with newer diesel, gasoline, propane, low ​NOx certified or battery electric buses. This opportunity has funded 23 diesel buses and 8 propane buses at school districts across the state since January of 2020. Applications for this opportunity are due November 15, 2021 with project completion by August of 2022.

The grants are funded through the Volkswagen Environmental Mitigation Trust Agreement and EPA’s Diesel Emissions Reduction Act, respectively.

The grant announcements celebrate National Drive Electric Week that raises awareness of the benefits of driving ​all-electric or ​plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

DEQ is hosting a webinar on October 6 at 2 p.m. for those interested in learning more about the funding opportunities​, to register visit: Webinar Registration – Zoom.

For more information and to view the ​request for applications visit: Deq.mt.gov/energy/programs/fuels.

Electric Vehicles Roadmap Initiative Special Report

The Western Governor’s Association released their Special Report of the Electric Vehicles Roadmap Initiative. This report contains targeted recommendations on federal policy issues that affect public and private investments in EV infrastructure across the West. It also includes an umbrella agreement among states around a shared set of principles regarding EV infrastructure planning and identified a suite of voluntary standards to optimize public and private EV infrastructure investments.

YTCC is proud to have partnered on this initiative!

Electric Vehicle Experience Program Launches

Lower Valley Energy Launches ‘Electric Vehicle Experience’ Program with Local Partners

Lower Valley Energy launches ‘Electric Vehicle Experience Program’ with partners, Yellowstone-Teton Clean Cities, Energy Conservation Works and Teton Conservation District allowing co-op members to borrow an electric vehicle for 1-3 days to determine if an electric vehicle fits their daily driving needs. Live Streamed ribbon cutting, Thursday, September 9th at 1:00pm.

Jackson, WY | September 2nd— Have you wanted to test drive an electric vehicle (EV) but haven’t had the opportunity? Now is your chance! Yellowstone-Teton Clean Cities (YTCC) was awarded a grant from Teton Conservation District to offer the EV Experience program, allowing Lower Valley Energy co-op members to test-drive an electric vehicle for free, to learn about the technology and determine if an electric vehicle fits their daily driving needs. YTCC partnered with Lower Valley Energy to host and develop the program as well as Energy Conservation Works to support program development and marketing efforts. Currently dealerships in Jackson and surrounding areas seldom have electric vehicles on the lot available for test-drives, therefore this program was developed to provide access to those interested in testing an electric vehicle.

There are many questions a consumer rightfully has when considering purchasing an electric vehicle. Can I charge at home? How far can an electric vehicle go before I need to charge? Will there be charging stations located where I need them along my route? Is there anything tricky about driving an electric vehicle? How does it handle mountainous terrain? The EV Experience will help answer these frequent questions, through first-hand experience.

 “YTCC has provided electric vehicle education and awareness programs since 2012 but the missing piece has always been the ability for folks to get behind the wheel and simply take an electric vehicle for a spin. These test drives help provide the answer to many of the questions a potential EV owner may have. We’re very excited to help provide this resource to our community,” states Alicia Cox, Executive Director of Yellowstone-Teton Clean Cities.

“As the local electricity provider, we are excited to participate in this program to help educate our membership on the benefits of electric vehicles,” says Amy Walton, Conservation Manager at Lower Valley Energy.

This free program allows individuals 1-3 days to try the 2020 Chevrolet Bolt with a range of over 250 miles and free charging at numerous stations provided by the Town of Jackson, Teton County, Teton Village Association and local businesses. This iteration of the program will run for 3 years.

“We are very excited to work with our great partners to offer LVE members access to an EV to see how it fits the Jackson lifestyle,’ added Phil Cameron, Executive Director of Energy Conservation Works. ‘We know these vehicles cost less to operate, and with our clean electricity mix, drastically reduce emissions. We’re excited to give more community members a chance to get behind the wheel!”

We are in the midst of an electric vehicle boom with almost every major car manufacturer having made aggressive and financially significant electric vehicle production targets. There are currently 26 all-electric models and 44 plug-in hybrid electric vehicle models on the market. Starting this fall, light-duty pick-up trucks, a vehicle segment of particular interest to our mountainous area, could be available. The roll-out of the electrified version of the United States’ best selling vehicle, the F-150 Lightning, as well as trucks from GM and others, begin spring of 2022, with Rivian slated for truck deliveries this month.

In the United States, transportation is the largest greenhouse gas-emitting sector, with 29% of all greenhouse gas emissions attributed to transportation. Of that amount, 58% of all transportation emissions result from light-duty vehicles. Locally, 65% of our emissions are attributed to ground transportation. Driving an electric vehicle in Teton County reduces lifetime emissions by 96% with Lower Valley Energy’s clean electrical grid-mix and reduces tailpipe emissions to zero. And if you choose to purchase Green Power through Lower Valley Energy, your total emissions reduce to zero.

This program is an excellent example of community partnerships, including those who have worked to offer this specific program but also the Town of Jackson, Teton County, Teton Village Association and local businesses who have invested in electric vehicle charging station infrastructure in this community, allowing for a program such as this to be successful.

Project partners will host a virtual ribbon cutting on Thursday, September 9th at 1:00pm. The program will be live streamed from Lower Valley Energy’s Jackson office. Please join the livestream by visiting Energy Conservation Works’ facebook page.

If you are interested in signing up for the program visit Lower Valley’s website at lvenergy.com. If you are interested in purchasing an electric vehicle or other alternative fuels and would like supportive information and resources, please reach out to Yellowstone-Teton Clean Cities staff.

____________________________________________________________________________

Lower Valley Energy is the rural electrical cooperative serving Teton County and Lincoln County, WY.

Energy Conservation Works is a joint powers board formed between the Town of Jackson, Teton County, Lower Valley Energy and offers leadership, engagement, and implementation specific to energy conservation, energy efficiency, renewable energy and emission reductions.

Yellowstone-Teton Clean Cities is the sole regional designee of the Department of Energy’s Clean Cities program. YTCC works to advance alternative fuels, vehicles and infrastructure and sustainable transportation options to increase energy security and sustainability in the Greater Yellowstone region.

START BUS UNVEILS 8 ELECTRIC PROTERRA BUSES TO SERVE THE TETON VILLAGE ROUTE

JACKSON, WYO. – START Bus and Proterra, a leading innovator in heavy-duty electric transportation, unveiled the community’s first of eight Proterra® ZX5 battery-electric transit buses. They are the first battery-electric buses in Wyoming and first Proterra ZX5 buses to be deployed in the United States.

START Bus will put the buses into service in late November. START hosted Proterra representatives for a small ribbon-cutting ceremony on Nov. 12. Due to COVID-19, it was not a public event. For the public to join in the fun, next Thursday, Nov. 19, from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. Yellowstone-Teton Clean Cities will host a webinar with Proterra representatives sharing specifics about the e-bus deployment in Teton County and the premiere of a video about the project. Look for Zoom details through Yellowstone-Teton Clean Cities.

Darren Brugmann START Director notes, “START Bus and the Town of Jackson are thrilled to add battery-electric buses to our fleet. These buses will provide cost effective, clean, efficient transportation, and help START reduce emissions to improve air quality. START is committed to transitioning 40% of its fleet to electric by 2022 and deploying these first eight buses is a major step toward that goal.”

START selected the 40-foot Proterra ZX5 MAX battery-electric transit bus with 660 kWh of onboard energy and the DuoPower™ drivetrain.

Just available in September, the Proterra ZX5 MAX can deliver up to 329 miles of drive range, which represents the most energy storage and longest drive range of any 40-foot electric bus available in the market today.

The DuoPower drivetrain delivers nearly twice the horsepower and five times better fuel efficiency than a standard diesel engine. It features two electric motors that deliver an impressive 550 horsepower, accelerating a ZX5 bus from 0 to 20 mph in under six seconds.

In addition, the DuoPower can propel a bus up a 25% grade, making it an ideal option for routes with steep hills. By combining this drivetrain with Proterra’s industry-leading battery technology and lightweight composite bus body, this vehicle provides superior performance and is designed to tackle Jackson’s routes and winter climate.

START utilized Proterra’s battery lease program to help lower the upfront price of their buses and ensure funding to deploy eight at once, representing one-third of START’s total fleet.

“Proterra is excited to partner with START to bring the first battery-electric transit buses to Wyoming and deliver clean, quiet transportation to local riders,” said John Walsh, Proterra’s Senior Vice President.

Manufactured in the United States, Proterra battery-electric buses feature zero tailpipe emissions, saving approximately 230,000 pounds of greenhouse gases annually when replacing diesel buses. The purpose-built electric buses further offer a quieter ride for reduced noise pollution, greater efficiency, and lower operating costs than combustion engine vehicles.

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About START
START Bus is a public transit system serving Jackson and Teton County, Wyoming, and nearby areas including Teton Village, Star Valley and Teton Valley, Idaho. It is owned and operated by the Town of Jackson.

About Proterra
Proterra is a leader in the design and manufacture of zero-emission, heavy-duty electric vehicles, enabling bus fleet operators to significantly reduce operating costs while delivering clean, quiet transportation to local communities across North America. The company’s configurable ZX5 platform is designed to serve the daily mileage needs of a wide range of transit routes on a single charge. With industry-leading durability and energy efficiency based on rigorous U.S. independent testing, Proterra products are proudly designed, engineered and manufactured in America. For more information, visit: www.proterra.com.

Source: Town of Jackson, WY

New Funding Announcement

The Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) announced two new clean transportation funding opportunities using the State’s Volkswagen Settlement funds. Applications for both are due January 11, 2021. Additional details are provided below.

Fast Charge Your Ride

DEQ is seeking eligible applicants interested in installing Level 3 direct current fast charging (DCFC) stations along key travel corridors in Montana. DCFC stations are capable of providing at least a 50-kilowatt (kW) output for a single vehicle. Each DCFC station location must also have a Level 2 station on site for redundancy in case the DCFC station is temporarily out of service, already in use, or for use by vehicles unable to use the DCFC station.

Proposed EVCS locations eligible for funding are along I-90, I-15, US-93, and a portion of US-2. Additional priority locations include Gardiner, Seeley Lake, and West Yellowstone.

The purpose of this program is to help fund the installation of EVCS stations for light duty vehicles in support of expanding electric vehicle charging infrastructure along key travel corridors in Montana in order to help reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), greenhouse gases and particulate matter associated with light duty vehicles in Montana.

Find the Request for Applications (RFA) here. Read the RFA to determine if your proposal requires the Corridor application or the Additional Priority Location application.

Clean School Bus Program

DEQ is soliciting interest from all K-12 schools and all districts in Montana to replace model years 1996-2019 diesel-powered C and D type school buses with new battery-electric or certified low NOx emission school buses or model year 1996-2009 diesel-powered C and D type school buses with propane and cleaner diesel buses.

The application and instructions provide the information to allow schools to determine whether they are eligible to apply. Districts that operate their own buses or contract with a fleet manager are both eligible.

Find the Request for Applications and application here.

Questions?

If you have questions about either funding opportunity or eligibility, please contact Neal Ullman at 406-444-6582 or neal.ullman@mt.gov.

WY DEQ Seeks Public Input On How To Spend $8 million in VW Settlement Funds

Please consider submitting a comment to WY DEQ through their comment link below. Yellowstone-Teton Clean Cities agrees with WY DEQ’s goals and objectives but recommends including alternative fuels, particularly compressed natural gas and electric. Please reach out to YTCC if you would like to discuss project or goal and objectives ideas prior to your comment submission. If you would simply like to fill out a form, please find our Project Form below 

Wyoming will focus on the following project types:

  • Class 8 local freight trucks.
  • Class 4 – 8 School buses, shuttle buses, or transit buses.
  • Pre-tier 4 diesel switcher locomotives.
  • Class 4 – 7 local freight trucks.
  • Airport Ground Support Equipment.

The State Of Wyoming has developed the following program goals and objectives to form the basis and selection criteria for the mitigation plan.

  • Reduce nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions.
  • Achieving higher cost-effectiveness (more emissions reduced per amount spent).
  • Impact on non-attainment areas.
  • Affecting areas of greater population density.
  • Affecting sensitive populations (such as children and the elderly).

The Department is reaching out to the public as it plans how best to utilize the approximately $8 million dollars gained from the settlement.

For more information related to this settlement CLICK HERE to visit the EPA’s website dedicated to this topic.

Members of the public with thoughts or suggestions on the Mitigation Trust funds should utilize the submit comments link below.

Public comments will be accepted for 30 days and will end on May 24, 2017.

Click Here to submit comments

Question of the Month

Question of the Month: How is fuel economy determined and reported for alternative fuel vehicles?

 

Answer: Last month we learned about how the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) determines and reports conventional light-duty vehicle fuel economy ratings. While alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) fuel economy testing is largely similar to that of conventional fuels, the EPA makes some adjustments to account for different vehicle technology and fuel energy content. By tailoring AFV fuel economy testing and reporting, the EPA is able to provide apples-to-apples comparisons and allow consumers to make informed decisions.

 

All-Electric Vehicles

 

What’s Reported: The fuel economy label for all-electric vehicles (EVs) includes all of the same information as that listed for gasoline vehicles (fuel economy, fuel cost savings, annual fuel cost, and emissions). However, EV labels list fuel economy using miles per gallon of gasoline-equivalent (MPGe), sometimes referred to as miles per gasoline gallon equivalent (MPGGE). MPGe represents the number of miles a vehicle can go using a quantity of fuel with the same energy content as a gallon of gasoline. MPGe is a useful way to compare gasoline vehicles with vehicles that use fuel not dispensed in gallons. EV labels also include the following information:

 

[if !supportLists]·        [endif]Vehicle Charge Time: Indicates how long it takes to charge a fully discharged battery using Level 2, 240-volt electric vehicle supply equipment.

[if !supportLists]·        [endif]Driving Range: Estimates the approximate number of miles that a vehicle can travel in combined city and highway driving before the battery must be recharged.

[if !supportLists]·        [endif]Fuel Consumption Rate: Shows how many kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity an EV would use to travel 100 miles. Like gallons per 100 miles, the kWh per 100 miles relates directly to the amount of fuel used. It is an estimated rate of consumption rather than economy (measured in miles per gallon [MPG] or MPGe), which allows for more accurate energy usage comparisons between vehicles.

 

What’s Tested: To test EV fuel economy, the vehicle battery is fully charged and the vehicle is parked overnight. The next day, the vehicle is tested over successive city cycles until the battery is depleted. The battery is then recharged and the energy consumption of the vehicle is determined by dividing the kWh of energy needed to recharge the battery by the miles traveled by the vehicle. MPGe is based on this figure. The process is repeated for highway driving cycles, and the combined city and highway fuel consumption and MPGe is based on the standard ratio of 55% city and 45% highway driving.

 

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

 

What’s Reported: Like EVs, plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) fuel economy labels include fuel cost savings, annual fuel cost, and emissions information. For PHEVs that can use either electricity or gasoline (but only one fuel at a time), also known as non-blended or series PHEVs, labels include information for the fuel economy of both fuel modes. The electricity information is identical to that of EVs, listing charge time, fuel economy in MPGe, and fuel consumption rate in kWh per 100 miles. The gasoline information provides fuel economy in MPG and fuel consumption information in gallons per 100 miles. PHEV fuel economy labels also include electricity only, gasoline only, and combined electricity and gasoline driving range estimates. For PHEVs that use electricity and gasoline at the same time, also known as blended or parallel PHEVs, fuel economy labels reflect the fuel economy, fuel consumption, and range of the vehicle when it uses its standard electricity and gasoline mix.

 

What’s Tested: Because series PHEVs can use either electricity or gasoline, the EPA determines a vehicle’s fuel economy and fuel consumption based both on its use of only electricity and only gasoline. To determine a PHEV’s electric fuel economy, the EPA issues testing methodology nearly identical to that of EVs. If the gasoline engine is required to complete the test cycle, the EPA methodology uses both the electric energy consumption and the gasoline consumption to calculate the MPGe values for the electric operation only. Vehicle testing for the gasoline operation of the vehicle is similar to any other conventional hybrid electric vehicle. Parallel PHEVs are tested using their standard mix of electricity and gasoline.

 

Other Alternative Fuels

 

What’s Reported: The EPA also requires fuel economy information for original equipment manufacturer (OEM) vehicles that use alternative fuels. This includes dedicated natural gas, propane, and hydrogen vehicles, as well as bi-fuel vehicles, such as bi-fuel natural gas, propane, and flexible fuel vehicles (vehicles that may use 51%-83% ethanol-gasoline blends). Note that the EPA does not require fuel economy testing of vehicles converted to run alternative fuels after they are purchased. While the EPA does not list fuel economy information for vehicles that use biodiesel, all diesel vehicles may use fuel blends of up to 5% biodiesel. These vehicles achieve fuel economy very similar to conventional diesel.

 

For vehicles that use exclusively alternative fuels (e.g., natural gas or hydrogen), the EPA lists fuel economy in MPGe in order to accurately reflect the fuel’s energy content and make easy comparisons with conventional fuel vehicles. Vehicles that can use either alternative fuels or conventional fuel, such as bi-fuel natural gas, bi-fuel propane, and flexible fuel vehicles, have fuel economy, fuel consumption, and range estimates for both the alternative and conventional fuel listed on their fuel economy labels. Fuel economy for alternative fuel use in bi-fuel and flexible fuel vehicles is listed in MPGe, while fuel economy for conventional fuel use is listed in MPG.

 

What’s Tested: For vehicles that run exclusively on alternative fuels, fuel economy testing methods are similar to those of conventional vehicles. For bi-fuel and flexible fuel vehicles, the vehicle fuel economy is tested as it runs exclusively on each fuel, similar to PHEVs.

 

For more information about AFV fuel economy, see the FuelEconomy.gov website (http://www.fueleconomy.gov/) and select from the Advanced Cars & Fuels menu. Also, view the Fuel Economy Toolkit (http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/toolkit.shtml). 

 

Happy Holidays!

 

Clean Cities Technical Response Service Team

technicalresponse@icf.com

800-254-6735

 

Why are there so many Tesla stations at the Jackson Whole Grocer?

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Ever since the installation of the Tesla Superchargers at Jackson Whole Grocer, we have had many questions as to why there are 8 of them.  For a community where only a couple dozen electric vehicles are owned, 8 seems to be a bit excessive at first glance.  But as with everything, Tesla has a pretty good explanation for this.

According to Tesla, it costs the same to install 4 stations as it does to install 8. Although it is unlikely that all 8 stations will be full all day right now, Tesla believes in building infrastructure for the future.  If you are familiar with Tesla’s business plan, you will know they intend to produce a large volume of less expensive vehicles in the next two years.  When this cheaper vehicle, The Model 3, is on the roads, it is likely that 8 superchargers won’t be enough.

Medium- and heavy-duty vehicle fuel efficiency

Question of the Month: What are the current and future medium- and heavy-duty vehicle fuel efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions standards?

 Answer:

 According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from medium- and heavy-duty vehicles (collectively, HDVs) are expected to surpass light-duty vehicle (LDV) emissions by 2030. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 directed the U.S. Department of Transportation to establish fuel efficiency standards for HDVs. Then, in 2010, President Obama announced a new national program to implement coordinated fuel efficiency and GHG emissions standards for medium- and heavy-duty engines and vehicles. As you may have seen last month, EPA and NHSTA recently finalized the most recent set of requirements under this program.

 

First promulgated by EPA and NHTSA in 2011, these coordinated standards are being implemented in two separate phases, beginning with Model Year (MY) 2014 to 2018 (Phase 1, which has now been extended through 2020) and followed by MYs 2021 to 2027 (Phase 2), with some exceptions. Under Phase 1, the GHG emissions and fuel efficiency standards generally increase in stringency in MY 2017, then remain steady through MY 2020. GHG emissions and fuel efficiency standards under Phase 2 of the program increase first in MY 2021, and then again in MYs 2024 and 2027. Although the Phase 2 standards do not begin until MY 2021, manufacturers may need to begin compliance measures beforehand in order to be adequately prepared to meet the targets.

 

Fuel efficiency and GHG emissions standards are determined differently for each of five regulated heavy-duty (HD) engine and vehicle categories: combination tractors; vocational vehicles; HD engines used in combination tractors and vocational vehicles; trailers used with combination tractors; and HD pickup trucks and vans. For more information on these categories, please refer to pages 3 and 4 of the EPA Phase 2 fact sheet (https://www3.epa.gov/otaq/climate/documents/420f16044.pdf).

 

NHTSA Fuel Efficiency Standards

NHTSA’s fuel efficiency standards are designed to take into account the different functions of each of the regulated vehicle categories. Therefore, the standards are calculated differently for each vehicle category. For HD pickup trucks and vans, there are separate gasoline and diesel target values.

 

The vehicle-based standards for combination tractors and vocational vehicles are calculated based on weight class, as well as specific characteristics of the vehicle category that affect fuel consumption and emissions, such as roof height for combination tractors and drive cycle for vocational vehicles.

 

The HD engine standards are determined by the size of the engine, the fuel type (diesel or gasoline), and the characteristics of the respective vehicles into which they are installed. The HD pickup and van standards, engine and chassis included, are fleet-average standards based on fuel-specific (gasoline and diesel) target values that are determined by a “work factor” curve. The “work factor” curve takes into account the payload and towing capacity of the vehicle and whether the vehicle has 4-wheel drive. Like the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) program for LDVs, the HD pickup and van targets are production-weighted based on the manufacturer’s total sales volume of all of its different HD pickup and van models.

 

Compliance Timeline

Manufacturers were required to meet Phase 1 fuel efficiency standards for combination tractors, vocational vehicles, and HD engines beginning either in MY 2016 or 2017. Phase 2 standards apply in MY 2027, with phase-in standards for MYs 2021 and 2024. Trailer fuel efficiency standards are voluntary beginning in MY 2018, and mandatory effective MY 2021. Manufacturers were not required to participate in the Phase 1 HD pickup and van program until MY 2016. At the outset of the program, NHTSA gave manufacturers the option to choose one of the alternative phase-in options for the Phase 1 standards. Phase 2 HD pickup and van standards begin in MY 2021 and increase in stringency by 2.5% each model year through MY 2027.

 

Fuel Efficiency Standards and Targets

To view the final Phase 1 standards and HD pickup and van targets, please see the Phase 1 Final Rule. For the recently finalized Phase 2 standards and targets, see the Phase 2 Final Rule. You may also reach out to TRS directly (technicalresponse@icfi.com) if you would like specific information about where to find the finalized standards.

 

EPA GHG Emissions Standards

EPA also takes into account the varying functions of each of the regulated vehicle categories in its GHG emissions calculation. It uses the same factors as NHTSA to determine emissions standards for each vehicle category, except measurements are based on grams of carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted.

 

Compliance Timeline

EPA’s mandatory Phase 1 GHG emissions standards for combination tractors, vocational vehicles, and HD engines began in MY 2014. The timeline for the Phase 2 standards mirrors that of the NHTSA fuel efficiency standards. However, Phase 2 trailer emissions standards differ in that they are mandatory in MY 2018. For Phase 1 of the HD pickup truck and van program, similar to the fuel efficiency targets, manufacturers were given the option to choose from two alternative phase-in options. As with the Phase 2 fuel efficiency targets, the separate GHG emissions targets for diesel and gasoline HD pickups and vans will increase in stringency under Phase 2 by 2.5% per year from MY 2021 to 2027.

 

Emissions Standards and Targets

GHG emissions standards and targets for Phase 1 and Phase 2 can be found in their respective final rules. Please refer to the Fuel Efficiency Standards and Targets section above for more information.

 

Compliance

Manufacturers may employ many different compliance measures to meet the fuel efficiency and GHG emissions standards. These measures vary depending on the vehicle category. Each vehicle category has a different certification testing process to determine its GHG emissions and fuel efficiency values. These values are the baseline to which any additional earned credits can be added. The regulation also offers incentives to encourage advanced vehicle technologies.

 

The credits and incentives available for both the EPA and NHTSA programs include:

Advanced Technology Credits: Phase 1 of the program incentivizes manufacturers to produce advance technology vehicles and engines by effectively allowing manufacturers to “count” certain vehicle and engine types as more than one in their compliance calculations. This includes vehicles with hybrid powertrains and Rankine-cycle waste heat recovery systems, as well as plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) and fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs). As the new Phase 2 standards are premised on some use of Rankine-cycle engines and hybrid powertrains, these technologies will not qualify as advanced technologies under Phase 2. From MY 2021 through MY 2027, advanced technology credits (with considerably higher multipliers) will only be offered for PEVs and FCEVs.

Innovative Technology and Off-Cycle Credits: Both Phases 1 and 2 of the program allow manufacturers to earn credits for off-cycle technologies that result in benefits that are not captured in certification testing procedures.

Early Credit Multipliers: Phase 1 of the program enabled manufacturers to earn credits for early compliance. Phase 2 will not include early credits.

 

For more information on the medium- and heavy-duty engine and vehicle GHG emissions and fuel efficiency standards, please refer to the following resources:

EPA Regulations and Standards: Heavy-Duty page: https://www3.epa.gov/otaq/climate/regs-heavy-duty.htm

NHTSA CAFE: Fuel Economy page: http://www.nhtsa.gov/fuel-economy

 

 

Clean Cities Technical Response Service Team

technicalresponse@icfi.com

800-254-6735